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Modern life is stressful, fast-paced, and action-packed.

There’s always a target date to satisfy, a consultation to get to, an e-mail to return. Heck, I in some cases discover myself struggling to discover time to go to the washroom throughout the workday, so I understand that time is scarce.

Given the hectic truth that all of us need to cope with every day, the lure of spending for ease services and products is really effective.

Again, when bathroom breaks start to seem unlikely to fit into my schedule, the idea of preparing my own lunch and brewing my own coffee begins to seem favorably overwhelming. It’s so much easier to just swing by Safeway in the morning, pick up a ready meal and a grande vanilla latte and proceed with my day. Why trouble going to the problem of doing it myself?

Well, I do bother. I trouble a lot, actually. Simply put, paying for convenience is expensive. Sure, a take-out dinner here and salon manicure there just cost a few added dollars and the cost savings in time makes them seem so worth it. And if you really do only delight in these benefits infrequently, they most likely won’t bust your budget. But if you allow them too frequently, the costs really start to mount. Take the following example:

In a given month, let us state you eat lunch at work 20 times. A lunch prepared in the house typically costs around $2, so it costs you about $40 to eat lunch that month. But what if you purchased take-out for lunch every day instead? That’d most likely run you about $8 a pop, so in this situation it costs you $160 to consume lunch for the month. That’s a difference of whopping $120 per month!

Of course, female cannot live on carry-out noodles alone– a lady’s gotta have some caffeine to obtain her with the day. So let us say you drink a huge coffee every morning to kick the day off right. A large coffee prepared in the home expenses about $.60 to prepare, so if you bring your coffee with you to work, it’s costing you $12 per month. However a huge coffee at Starbucks goes for about $2. If you decide to let your local barista prepare your daily repair, it’s going to cost you $40 per month. That’s a difference of $28.

Now, maybe you are thinking: “Exactly what’s $28 or $120 during my life time? In the grand scheme of things, does it really matter?” However it’s not the $28 or $120 per se that’s the issue, it’s the advancing effect of all of those benefit purchases that begins to look like a waste. Utilizing the example above, if you were to invest the roughly $150 per month that you are throwing away on take-out food and beverage in a moderate-growth stock fund, you could end up with $291,000 at the end of a 40-year occupation. That’s almost one-third of the method to being a millionaire, simply for preparing a few lousy lunches and cups of coffee!

So when it comes to spending for benefit, I just say no. The price tag – $291,000– is simply expensive!